Four Courts Donnchadh Ó Corráin Prize

The Four Courts Donnchadh Ó Corráin Prize 2018

In 2018, the Irish Conference of Medievalists, with the generous support of Four Courts Press, will award the Four Courts Donnchadh Ó Corráin Prize for the best paper in medieval Irish history presented at the conference by a postgraduate or early-career scholar.

The prize has been instituted in honour of the late Donnchadh Ó Corráin, one of the foremost historians of early medieval Ireland. Professor Emeritus of Medieval History, University College Cork, he was founder and director of the ArCH, CELT and Multi-Text Projects in UCC. He founded, and until recently edited, Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland; and he was one of the founders of the Irish Conference of Medievalists itself. His research interests included: the history and historiography of the early Middle Ages, Irish law, the Irish church, medieval Irish literature, genealogy, Irish manuscripts, Viking studies, and computer applications in the humanities, especially the creation of corpora and the analysis of text. He published widely and often, from the seminal Ireland Before the Normans (Dublin, 1972) to The Irish Church, its Reform and the English Invasion (Dublin, 2017). He died on the 25th October 2017, a few months after the publication of his magnum opus Clavis Litterarum Hibernensium: Medieval Irish Books & Texts c. 400 – c. 1600 (Turnhout, 2017), a three-volume bibliography of Irish texts and manuscripts.

Any paper in the area of medieval Irish history presented at the ICM by a postgraduate or early-career scholar may be submitted. The winning entrant will receive a €150 book token from Four Courts Press.

The adjudicating panel will be headed by Dr Emer Purcell, Donnchadh Ó Corráin’s last doctoral student and one of the editors (with Paul MacCotter, Julianne Nyhan and John Sheehan) of his Festschrift, Clerics, Kings and Vikings (Dublin, 2015).

Papers should be submitted to icm@ucc.ie no later than 5pm Monday 30th July. PDF or Word formats are preferable, and papers should not normally exceed 5,000 words in length, including footnotes. The winner will be announced in September 2018.